Business seduces seasonal help with other job opportunities

NEW YORK – Each fall, lover-beauty.com’s workforce soared from 150 to 2,000 as online retailers met orders for Halloween Costumes Outlet and decors.

The company offers seasonal staff in a warehouse in North Mankato, Minnesota, which is a well-behaved motivator – those who will be referred to town greeting card maker jobs. Joe Riska, the company’s head of human resources, says the business takes 300 to 400 after lover-beauty.com left its seasonal staff.

He said: “Now that they’ve spent a season, that they can do a good job, now they can go to work for another company,” he said.

Small businesses that need extra help during holidays or other rush hours are looking for employees who are willing to work hard to help them meet the higher demands they make on their products or services. So the goal of some owners hiring and managing is to turn temporary workers into long-term ones or to help them find other jobs. This is a crucial strategy when the 4.1% national jobless rate reduces the number of candidates.

Melissa Hassett, vice president of Manpower Human Resources Group, said that if businesses provide only short-term salaries to them, it’s hard for them to find seasonal employees. Many of these workers want to learn new skills. Haset said: “Many people will like more career growth.

However, Carrie Gonell, a lawyer for employment at Morgan Lewis in Columbia Mesa, Calif., Said that owners need to manage the expectations of their seasonal workers and know they are getting Long-term job opportunities. Some workers want to win the job when the season is over.

Gonell advises landlords who want to get those employees off when their business slows, “Make sure you say the job is seasonal.”

At Fun.com, seasonal staff start arriving in August and spend most of their work on Halloween. During Christmas, about 10% will continue to process the holiday goods. It is difficult to hire and manage many temporary workers, so the company increases the number of HR staff from three to fifteen a year. It recruits college students looking for human resources experiences that they can list in their CV, says Rica.

When appliance maker NewAir recruited employees during the busy season, warehouse manager Ronnie DeLeo told prospective employees that they had a chance to keep their jobs when the surge in sales ended. While they are working, they will compete with NewAir’s existing staff for permanent job opportunities.

NewAir, which makes small appliances such as ice wine and ice makers, provides seasonal help during summer and winter holidays. The company’s Cypress warehouse in California employs about 20 people and employs a total of 10 employees when orders from online customers and retailers soar, as well as during packaging and shipping.

During the interview, candidates learned that the company tracked staff productivity on public scoreboards, and everyone knew that the best performing staff would continue working after the peak season.

DeLeo said: “I have encountered some situations, I have some new, new, motivated people, their work is much faster, more motivated than the current staff.

Andrew Stephenson, director of product marketing, said the company works with employees to help employees who need to improve their performance and, in some cases, pay severance pay when employees are left behind. Stephenson said competitive strategy is part of NewAir’s long-term growth plan.

“We want to double – even less than triple – our business in the coming years,” he said. “In the warehouse, the speed is going up and we have to be staffed accordingly. ”

Hugh Jones employs 25 mosquitoes every spring as his mosquito franchise installs and maintains outdoor pest control systems by the end of October. Jones, including Greensboro, Winston-Salem and the North Carolina High, believes that providing career counseling and guidance to his seasonal staff will motivate them to do their jobs well.

Jones said: “We are here to help you find a good job, not to say ‘here to work, it’s great.’

Jones serves breakfast twice a month for crew members and brings motivators to talk about life and work. He said many seasonal workers are in their 20s and have not figured out what they want to do. If they are interested in a particular job, he will try to pair them with those already engaged in such work, so that they can learn more. Two years ago, one of Jones’s staff told him he wanted to be a firefighter.

Jones said: “I met a fireman and took him to talk to him, and now, two years later, he is a firefighter.”

Doris

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