Long-term independent residents celebrate their 100th birthday

Helen Young, who has lived independently for a long time, has achieved a milestone that most people can only hope for. On April 6, she celebrated her 100th birthday.

At her current retirement community in the East Park in Brook Park, her room’s table was covered with 80 birthday cards. Tied to her chair is a foil balloon with a colorful “100”.

Young people and other residents celebrated her birthday with pizza and cupcakes. Public spaces were decorated with festive tablecloths, flowers and a Smucker flag featuring Young. Happy birthday to her.

The young man and her compatriots play bingo and hear polka music because Yang is proud of her Polish background. She even won the 100th Anniversary of the Independent Mayor Antonio Togliatti. Some of the content was: “We have lived in Independant City for 64 years. This is a real gift for our community. We thank you for your contribution and hope you Understanding independence will always be your home. ”

In 1950, plans for young people living in rural areas arrived independently. Her friend said she was crazy, but she knew exactly what she wanted. Her house is one of the first houses built on a hillside road. Her husband Edward Yang personally built a house with the help of several friends.

Close to an acre of property, they added a barn in the backyard. The family kept chickens there and the young people prepared dinners for her family to clean up and cook.

She and her husband raised three daughters – Janice, Cindy and Linda – and another son, Edward. Young’s husband died in 2011, two months before the 72th anniversary of their marriage. She is also a four-year-old grandmother and four-year-old great-grandmother.

In her 64 years as an independent resident, Yang saw many changes in her quiet country town. When she arrived, there was only one beauty shop and a Rexall pharmacy next to St. Michael’s Catholic Church, where she was a parishioner.

Since most businesses are so far away, Young must learn to drive. Once she learned, she continued to drive until she was 95. A Chevy Impala, Oldsmobile and Buick Century are some cars that help her get anywhere she needs.

She drove not only to buy food for her family, but also helped her maintain a 30-year tradition: Young participated in a women’s club that played Pino every month at a different member’s home. In the end, she is the only member who still drives, and she accepts each member herself at home so that she can continue playing.

As she grew older, she drove less and she would tell her family: “I’m just in the corner.”

In her free time, she is an active member of the Isabella Guild – his wife’s opponent with the Columbus Cavaliers. Her cooking and baking has been in great demand at home or in local bakery sales. Young people make many Polish dishes, such as her pierogis filled with roast beef or fried dough hrusciki covered with powdered sugar.

Her daughter Linda remembered that her mother had made heart-shaped cookies on Valentine’s Day and had her go to school. Each cookie had its name written in icing.

Yang is a man who does things for himself because she is not only cooking and baking, but also an ardent sewer. She made coats, socks and homemade Halloween Costumes Outlet for adults.

Before becoming a loyal mother, Young first worked as a laundry worker in laundry facilities, checking clothes to make sure everything was sewn and sewn correctly. When the young man first moved to independence, she received a ride to work before she learned to drive.

Her daughter Cindy said: “Some people think she is a hard-working worker. I think we all have strong professional ethics because we learned something.”

During his 28 years as a waiter at Ye Olde Stage House, Yang’s professional ethics shined. The waitresses there must wear old-fashioned dresses and hats as their uniforms – and they must wear the clothes themselves.

She always speaks her own ideas and fights for herself and her own rights, even if it means to argue with the boss. Occasionally, she will join as a bartender because she is an honest worker and can also chat with customers. However, she did not stay there for a long time because of her outstanding ability as a waiter.

Some of her favorite memories from independence are to support her family and attend Family Day activities every summer. She and her husband go to listen to music every year, even to old age.

After the stroke in 2014, Yang must leave her home on the hillside. After living in the East Park assisted living, she went to the Dongyuan retirement community in the Memory Care Center. There, she likes to play games such as bingo and cards, and exercises every day.

When asked how it felt to reach 100, Yang said: “No different.” To her, birthday is just another day.

Her children think her longevity is because she has been very busy, whether it is redecorating furniture or trying to solve problems in the home.

Although she has a lot of things to do, Young stays calm and always tells her child: “The biggest problem with wasting time is worrying.”

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